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Why I Love the South

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  • Apr 12, 2012
    Why I Love the South

    Hi from my bunk, somewhere outside of Chattanooga, everyone.  Please accept my apologies for not blogging in, I don't know, like 14 years.  

    Whattup, hyperbole.

    I realized that I was overdue the other night when Seggie encouraged the audience to check out our website to post their photos & videos from the concert, something else I kinda zoned out on, and "read some of our long-winded blogs."  I turned to Don (the redheaded new guy) and said, "You should put a new blog up on the website," to which he replied "YOU should put a new blog up on the website."  

    He was right, albeit a little too sassy about it for a guy who's only been in the group for 20 minutes.  It's true, though:  I've been MIA from the site for awhile and don't really have any legitimate excuse that merits my time away from bringing y'all up to speed on what's going on in our world.

    Wait...did I just type "y'all?"  

    (Reads previous sentence)

    Huh.  Yep, sure did.

    That brings me to tonight's topic:  why I love the South.*

    *Contrary to what some people in Southern Indiana will tell you by their proclivity to drive around with Confederate flag bumper stickers on their cars, "The South" will henceforth be defined, in this blog entry at least, as any state that legitimately fought under Jefferson Davis in the Civil War and/or has a collective penchant for sweet tea, wrap-around porches, or calling it "PE-can pie."  That's a whole other blog entry, though.  (It's pe-CAHN, by the way...)

    Oh, and before anyone gets all Ken Burns on me or ponders to themselves "What does he know about the South, being from the Midwest," I'm well aware there were some states that were kiiiinda on the fence with whose side they were on back in the mid-19th century (Kansas, Missouri, I'm looking at you).  Trust me, I totally nerded out as a kid and went on a big Civil War kick from age 10 to ohhhhh...now.  If you haven't seen "Glory," you need to call your local Blockbuster, have them save you a copy of the VHS before anyone else gets to it, and get hip to it immediately.  Might be Matthew Broderick's best role ever after Ferris Bueller.  And that campfire singalong scene where Denzel breaks down?  C'mon!

    But I digress.

    I moved around a lot as a Navy kid and spent 1st & 2nd grade in Pascagoula, MS while my Dad was stationed there.  Our home was within walking distance of the Gulf of Mexico and, get this, on a bayou.  A bayou!  I don't even know what the exact definition of a bayou is, but we lived on one for two years and if that's not street cred for knowing something about the South, then I don't know what is.  Plus, it's just fun to say.  Bayou.  Go ahead, say it out loud.  Bayou.

    Now say "down by the bayou" five or six times.  Really try out some different accents, too.  Get comfy with it.  Your co-workers won't notice.

    I recall clearly having a fearful respect of that opaque, brownish water just past our backyard and the various critters (aka "swamp monsters" aka "swonsters") that inhabited them.  One time, I saw an alligator fighting a snapping turtle eating a baby Sasquatch in the water.  Not really, but think how awesome that would be.  My money'd be on the baby Sasquatch.  I would name him something totally rad like Captain Baby Sasquatch or, like...Clancy or something.  (Dibs on the intellectual property of "Captain Baby Sasquatch" and future series of children's books, merchandise line, and smash Pixar film)

    Plus...plus!...both sets of my grandparents lived in Florida and Florida's for sure somewhere near the South.  (= more street cred)

    Shoot, the little league team I played on in Mississippi was sponsored by the local Magnolia Skating Rink.  In case you didn't know, the magnolia is the official state flower of every state in the South.  They smell like angel wings.  (For the record, by "played on," I mean "hung out in left field the whole game while sifting dirt through my hat with four other kids, one of whom I don't even think spoke once all season.")

    Again...  Street.  Cred.  I'm basically in Lynyrd Skynyrd.

    Did I mention that I totally ralphed all over the place once at a friend's birthday party at Magnolia Skating Rink?  Yeah, there was a good stretch circa 1989-94 that I would just straight-up barf in public.  Dentist's office, busy restaurant after church, on the bus on the third day of school as the new kid...  You name it, odds are young me barfed there.  Hey, thanks for inviting me to your pizza party, I'm gonna go over here and barf all over the place, just kinda nonchalantly skate away, and then totally play dumb when someone discovers it and yells "Aw, gross!  Someone just totally barfed all over the place!"  Then my Mom'll pick me up and ask how the party was and I'll say something like "Oh, it was good, I definitely didn't throw up after the presents and before the couples skate.  Can we just go home so I can look through my telescope and never talk about this again?"

    Good times.

    Now that I've offended everyone in the South and probably made everyone reading this throw up a little in their mouths, I guess it's time I should actually get back to my original thesis.  

    Here are some things that I absolutely love about the South:

    1.  Y'all.  Freaking love it.  You + all = y'all.  (Ex.: "How y'all doing?")  It's like we're good friends and total strangers at the same time!

    2.  All y'all.  Even better!  Y'all's awesomely redundant cousin.  It's like the Spanish 3rd person ustedes form on steroids.  All + you all = all y'all.  (Ex.:  "Are all y'all going to Piggly Wiggly?")

    3.  All y'all's.  This one's a little tougher to grasp technically, but it's basically used to express a collective ownership of something.  (Ex.:  "Make sure y'all have all y'all's permission slips signed and on my desk by Friday.")  Author's note:  the northern version of "all y'all's" is "your guys's."

    4.  Truck stops.  I woke up outside a Love's truck stop in Texas recently, went in to survey the various sundries, and walked out proudly clutching a one-pound canister of beef jerky that I acquired for $27.99.  Robertson's from Oklahoma; check it out.  Worth every penny.  (By the way, as much as I love me some truck stops, no one I know loves them more than Mike.  That guy has sent me texts at 2:30 in the morning that say "Pilot station in 15 minutes.  You in?")

    5.  Spanish moss.  I know, I know, it's actually bad for the trees, but it's so cool looking.  It's like a lip piercing the tree got when it was 16 and then it has to go to a job interview at 22.

    6.  The food.  Do I really need to elaborate?

    7.  Our drivers, The Brothers Mickle, how much they loathe LSU football, and how they can make "Roll Tide" into a legitimate response to anything.  I know of no finer human beings than those two guys.  I want to experience a real Cullman, Alabama cookout with them before I die.  Roll Tide.

    8.  The subtly scandalous undertones of the phrase "Everything's bigger in Texas."

    9.  How a cowboy hat and cut-off t-shirt is completely socially acceptable evening-wear.  Dude in the audience in Bartlesville, Oklahoma, you know who you are.

    10.  The term "Bless his/her/your/their heart(s)."  It's juuuuuust barely more sweet than it is condescending.

    11.  The immediately disarming charm of a southern accent.  Gets me every time.

    12.  The tea.  Good night, the tea is good in the South.  I like to go my Papa's route and throw in 2 or 3 or 9 lemon wedges so it's more like tea-flavored lemon juice.  

    13.  How my Nana says "Good night" as a substitute for "My goodness."

    14.  Ghost tours.  I've never been on one, but I'm going the next time I'm in Charleston.  Still, love 'em.  

    15.  The combination of salt and decay wafting through the air down by the bayou.

    16.  Tonight's crowd in Chattanooga.  Wow.  Thank you if you were there!

    17.  Ft. Smith, Arkansas' airport.  It's the coziest, warmest (kinda oddest) airport I've ever experienced.  There are no less than 217 of the most comfortable-looking wingback chairs that greet you as you stroll through its expansive 4 gates.  I seriously thought an old woman wearing a bonnet was going to invite me to a game of checkers as I exited the gangway.  

    18.  Our lighting guy Blake and how much he loves his hometown of Houston.  He owns hundreds, if not thousands of Houston-related articles of clothing and only about 1/3rd of them have what "society" would call "sleeves."  I kid you not, go up to him at intermission and ask him what Houston shirt he's wearing.  He'll be the guy wearing the Astros hat and the beard.

    19.  How young women will call older women "ma'am" like...always.

    20.  How stinkin' friendly the people are.  You continuously raise the bar for us Midwesterners, southern brothers and sisters, and that's saying something.  

    Can't wait to get back down here soon and sing again for y'all.

    (I can say it, I lived here for awhile.)

    All y'all's truly,
    Ryan

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Ryan_5's picture
on 12 April 2012 - 4:26am

Hi from my bunk, somewhere outside of Chattanooga, everyone.  Please accept my apologies for not blogging in, I don't know, like 14 years.  

Whattup, hyperbole.

I realized that I was overdue the other night when Seggie encouraged the audience to check out our website to post their photos & videos from the concert, something else I kinda zoned out on, and "read some of our long-winded blogs."  I turned to Don (the redheaded new guy) and said, "You should put a new blog up on the website," to which he replied "YOU should put a new blog up on the website."  

He was right, albeit a little too sassy about it for a guy who's only been in the group for 20 minutes.  It's true, though:  I've been MIA from the site for awhile and don't really have any legitimate excuse that merits my time away from bringing y'all up to speed on what's going on in our world.

Wait...did I just type "y'all?"  

(Reads previous sentence)

Huh.  Yep, sure did.

That brings me to tonight's topic:  why I love the South.*

*Contrary to what some people in Southern Indiana will tell you by their proclivity to drive around with Confederate flag bumper stickers on their cars, "The South" will henceforth be defined, in this blog entry at least, as any state that legitimately fought under Jefferson Davis in the Civil War and/or has a collective penchant for sweet tea, wrap-around porches, or calling it "PE-can pie."  That's a whole other blog entry, though.  (It's pe-CAHN, by the way...)

Oh, and before anyone gets all Ken Burns on me or ponders to themselves "What does he know about the South, being from the Midwest," I'm well aware there were some states that were kiiiinda on the fence with whose side they were on back in the mid-19th century (Kansas, Missouri, I'm looking at you).  Trust me, I totally nerded out as a kid and went on a big Civil War kick from age 10 to ohhhhh...now.  If you haven't seen "Glory," you need to call your local Blockbuster, have them save you a copy of the VHS before anyone else gets to it, and get hip to it immediately.  Might be Matthew Broderick's best role ever after Ferris Bueller.  And that campfire singalong scene where Denzel breaks down?  C'mon!

But I digress.

I moved around a lot as a Navy kid and spent 1st & 2nd grade in Pascagoula, MS while my Dad was stationed there.  Our home was within walking distance of the Gulf of Mexico and, get this, on a bayou.  A bayou!  I don't even know what the exact definition of a bayou is, but we lived on one for two years and if that's not street cred for knowing something about the South, then I don't know what is.  Plus, it's just fun to say.  Bayou.  Go ahead, say it out loud.  Bayou.

Now say "down by the bayou" five or six times.  Really try out some different accents, too.  Get comfy with it.  Your co-workers won't notice.

I recall clearly having a fearful respect of that opaque, brownish water just past our backyard and the various critters (aka "swamp monsters" aka "swonsters") that inhabited them.  One time, I saw an alligator fighting a snapping turtle eating a baby Sasquatch in the water.  Not really, but think how awesome that would be.  My money'd be on the baby Sasquatch.  I would name him something totally rad like Captain Baby Sasquatch or, like...Clancy or something.  (Dibs on the intellectual property of "Captain Baby Sasquatch" and future series of children's books, merchandise line, and smash Pixar film)

Plus...plus!...both sets of my grandparents lived in Florida and Florida's for sure somewhere near the South.  (= more street cred)

Shoot, the little league team I played on in Mississippi was sponsored by the local Magnolia Skating Rink.  In case you didn't know, the magnolia is the official state flower of every state in the South.  They smell like angel wings.  (For the record, by "played on," I mean "hung out in left field the whole game while sifting dirt through my hat with four other kids, one of whom I don't even think spoke once all season.")

Again...  Street.  Cred.  I'm basically in Lynyrd Skynyrd.

Did I mention that I totally ralphed all over the place once at a friend's birthday party at Magnolia Skating Rink?  Yeah, there was a good stretch circa 1989-94 that I would just straight-up barf in public.  Dentist's office, busy restaurant after church, on the bus on the third day of school as the new kid...  You name it, odds are young me barfed there.  Hey, thanks for inviting me to your pizza party, I'm gonna go over here and barf all over the place, just kinda nonchalantly skate away, and then totally play dumb when someone discovers it and yells "Aw, gross!  Someone just totally barfed all over the place!"  Then my Mom'll pick me up and ask how the party was and I'll say something like "Oh, it was good, I definitely didn't throw up after the presents and before the couples skate.  Can we just go home so I can look through my telescope and never talk about this again?"

Good times.

Now that I've offended everyone in the South and probably made everyone reading this throw up a little in their mouths, I guess it's time I should actually get back to my original thesis.  

Here are some things that I absolutely love about the South:

1.  Y'all.  Freaking love it.  You + all = y'all.  (Ex.: "How y'all doing?")  It's like we're good friends and total strangers at the same time!

2.  All y'all.  Even better!  Y'all's awesomely redundant cousin.  It's like the Spanish 3rd person ustedes form on steroids.  All + you all = all y'all.  (Ex.:  "Are all y'all going to Piggly Wiggly?")

3.  All y'all's.  This one's a little tougher to grasp technically, but it's basically used to express a collective ownership of something.  (Ex.:  "Make sure y'all have all y'all's permission slips signed and on my desk by Friday.")  Author's note:  the northern version of "all y'all's" is "your guys's."

4.  Truck stops.  I woke up outside a Love's truck stop in Texas recently, went in to survey the various sundries, and walked out proudly clutching a one-pound canister of beef jerky that I acquired for $27.99.  Robertson's from Oklahoma; check it out.  Worth every penny.  (By the way, as much as I love me some truck stops, no one I know loves them more than Mike.  That guy has sent me texts at 2:30 in the morning that say "Pilot station in 15 minutes.  You in?")

5.  Spanish moss.  I know, I know, it's actually bad for the trees, but it's so cool looking.  It's like a lip piercing the tree got when it was 16 and then it has to go to a job interview at 22.

6.  The food.  Do I really need to elaborate?

7.  Our drivers, The Brothers Mickle, how much they loathe LSU football, and how they can make "Roll Tide" into a legitimate response to anything.  I know of no finer human beings than those two guys.  I want to experience a real Cullman, Alabama cookout with them before I die.  Roll Tide.

8.  The subtly scandalous undertones of the phrase "Everything's bigger in Texas."

9.  How a cowboy hat and cut-off t-shirt is completely socially acceptable evening-wear.  Dude in the audience in Bartlesville, Oklahoma, you know who you are.

10.  The term "Bless his/her/your/their heart(s)."  It's juuuuuust barely more sweet than it is condescending.

11.  The immediately disarming charm of a southern accent.  Gets me every time.

12.  The tea.  Good night, the tea is good in the South.  I like to go my Papa's route and throw in 2 or 3 or 9 lemon wedges so it's more like tea-flavored lemon juice.  

13.  How my Nana says "Good night" as a substitute for "My goodness."

14.  Ghost tours.  I've never been on one, but I'm going the next time I'm in Charleston.  Still, love 'em.  

15.  The combination of salt and decay wafting through the air down by the bayou.

16.  Tonight's crowd in Chattanooga.  Wow.  Thank you if you were there!

17.  Ft. Smith, Arkansas' airport.  It's the coziest, warmest (kinda oddest) airport I've ever experienced.  There are no less than 217 of the most comfortable-looking wingback chairs that greet you as you stroll through its expansive 4 gates.  I seriously thought an old woman wearing a bonnet was going to invite me to a game of checkers as I exited the gangway.  

18.  Our lighting guy Blake and how much he loves his hometown of Houston.  He owns hundreds, if not thousands of Houston-related articles of clothing and only about 1/3rd of them have what "society" would call "sleeves."  I kid you not, go up to him at intermission and ask him what Houston shirt he's wearing.  He'll be the guy wearing the Astros hat and the beard.

19.  How young women will call older women "ma'am" like...always.

20.  How stinkin' friendly the people are.  You continuously raise the bar for us Midwesterners, southern brothers and sisters, and that's saying something.  

Can't wait to get back down here soon and sing again for y'all.

(I can say it, I lived here for awhile.)

All y'all's truly,
Ryan

Comments

psyoung's picture

The concert in Gainesville Florida this afternoon was incredible. Certainly don't need musical instruments when you have the Straight No Chaser's voices. Everyone of you individually is a star ! Your harmonies are magnificent. I believe that some of Ryan's post is supposed to be funny, but I've lived all those "Southern" things all my life and it's just something we do. Again, I can not say enough about today's concert (my first to see y'all live, definitely not my last). Please come back to Florida as soon as y'all can and we'll leave the back porch light on and be sure to have sweet tea in the fridge. Bless y'all's hearts.
VK's picture

Read you think Savannah, Ga has haunted houses. We also have a haunted brewery, Moon River Brewing Company, near the riverfront.It was featured on the Ghost Hunters program a few years back. On the Ghost Tour you get to ride in an open-air hearse. Savannah is riddled with ghost stories and sightings. That's why I'm a believer when people tell me strange stories. I even have the spirit of a Confederate officer at my house. I live just south of Charlotte, NC now. If you're ever in the Charlotte area, let me know and we'll talk about ghosts and hauntings.
IlliniKina's picture

As an Illini embedded in Gator Nation, I can relate to a lot of this post :) The southernism that made me chuckle when we first moved here was "fixin", as in "Hey y'all we're fixin to leave!" or "I'm fixin to go see SNC on Mother's Day". I agree with the Brothers Mickle on LSU. Go Gators :)
Keith Chasin' Chaser's picture

I'm from Texas the State of "Y'all". It comes out without thinking about it when I speak...can't help it. I also love the Civil War, the history of it that is, anything about history intrigues me. My favorite subject in school. Recommend visiting Vicksburg Mississippi historic landmark to the Civil War second to Gettysburg. Plus they have a really cool ship that was sunk from that era and now it is restored. Went here as a kid, they were almost finished restoring it...am now 37. Pretty sure it's done. I also like the movie Glory. Thanks for the post See y'all in October on Carnival Destiny. I'll be the fan with the big smile waiting with all my Cds in hand for an autograph. Y'all keep up the good work and keep churning out those Cds. You make em' I'll buy em'. Would love to hear Y'all sing "Hard to Say I'm Sorry" by Peter Cetera, also done by Az Yet...maybe on the boat huh...hint hint!
Caroline's picture

Great blog, Ryan! Although I've spent a limited amount of time in the South,that's all it takes to appreciate it! I can certainly relate to the Brothers Mickle - I've been married to an Alabama fan for nearly 33 years, and the center of his universe every football season is Tuscaloosa!!! And if you REALLY ask the brothers who they hate the MOST in the SEC, it won't be LSU...it will probably be the Auburn Tigers! I am not alllowed to speak during the "Iron Bowl" every year!!!! Roll Tide!!! Your comments about the Ft Smith INTERNATIONAL (!?) Airport is so true...but they must have expanded; last time we were there, they only had 2 gates!! Our friends live in Fort Smith and it's a place my husband would love to retire to. ( As is Eureka, AR - a bit north and east of Ft Smith!) I'm a Jersey Girl ( no...not "Joisey"! LOL!) but, whenever I speak to our friends, I find myself speaking in a southern accent within 10 minutes!!! Thanks again for such an entertaining view of your southern experiences. I hope the rest of the guys enjoed it , too. As for me... I'm waiting patiently to see you on April 28th at the NJ PAC! It's a great concert venue with great acoustics! BTW... we have 3 PBS stations in the NYC area...and they STILL haven't shown "Songs of the Decades"! Will "all y'all" be offering it on DVD in the future?
Kristy_6's picture

I have to say that this is the first time I have gotten in on the blogs, and I loved that this was the first one I read. You know what? I think the South loves you back. I know we definitely enjoyed you in Paducah Sunday night. I was one of the women at the PBS station meet and greet before the show (actually part of the second couple of people to have pictures made -- not the one who mentioned trying to figure out which one of you to take home to her daughter, but the one with her...) I had been looking forward to the show and was definitely not disappointed. Y'all were great! The PBS shows have been great, but there is nothing like seeing it live.
laura_9's picture

oh my lands, thanks for this post Ryan...hilarious and yet informational all at the same time.
MaryDSinTX's picture

Theme, not them...
MaryDSinTX's picture

"Pilot station in 15 minutes. You in?" by Mike. Seriously funny. Most favorite line: "Are all y'all going to Piggly Wiggly?" I have actually said that. Thank you for taking the time to write. I think baby Sasquatches as a them does have a future, too. #justsayin
rck's picture

"Ain't it great to be alive and in Tennessee!" --CDB The post was great! While I wasn't in Chattanooga for the show, my daughter was there and she & her friends LOVED IT!!! As for the South... There are many reasons why we say "American by birth, southerner by the grace of God." I have a signed first addition of "How To Speak Southern" by Steve Mitchel and Sam C. Rawls. It's a riot! Please don't take this as a commercial plug, but whether you're a yankee or a born again southerner, you need this book. I'm fixin' to get me some tea (Sweet tea, of course. There is no other kind!) so I gotta go. See all y'all later.
Christina S.'s picture

I swear, Ryan leaves me in stitches every time. Seriously funny man. Not fake.
cindy_13's picture

whewww Ryan you came with a blog "bigger then Texas". Look forward to your return to MAC country. Safe travels.
Erin Klausner's picture

I was a military brat too, but never made it further South than Nebraska! However, my Grandma, a North Carolinian, would always use ''Y' hear?" when making sure we caught her drift about something. i love that phrase and have found myself using it with my daughter frequently. Great blog Ryan! I'd be interested to hear your observations on Colorado.
Jeanette P.'s picture

Aaaaand...Ryan's back. Awesome, as always.
Kathy Mendoza's picture

Awwww, I've missed your blogs. This was awesome!
Amanda_5's picture

@ Eileen, I tend to use "spot on" frequently!
FrogKissingLady's picture

I WAS at the Chattanooga concert Wednesday night, it was my first SNC Live show but definately NOT my last! the show was FANTASTIC! Loved the premier of the new song, one of my favorite songs on the radio right now! You guys are amazing and hopefully you will be coming to Chattanooga again!
EileenR's picture

LOL @ Amanda using "spot on". That sounds like jargon from a blog about the UK tour! :)
chpatlanta's picture

So you were basically Kenny from South Park always puking everywhere at anything? God d@$%-it Kenny! Ha ha ha!
Jade Delahoussaye's picture

Haha all of these are so true! I'm a Tennesee native with Louisiana blood in me, so I agree with all of these, including the "y'alls" and us girls calling older women "m'am". The swamp water down in the bayous smell straight-up jank (don't know if that's a word...) and I CAN NOT go a week without sweet tea; it's virtually impossible. Thanks Ryan for giving me a good laugh today!
Amanda_5's picture

As a native of Texas (West Texas, at that) this made me smile. All of these are spot on too!
EileenR's picture

One of my 7-year-olds just used the word "Grandpappy" while playing with her dolls downstairs, sooo now I'm thinking southerner. And I misspelled "northerner" in my other comment. And I am wondering if those should be capitalized.
EileenR's picture

Thank you, Ryan, for this wonderful blog. I am in serious need of some smiles this week, and your blogs always deliver! Bless your heart! I think I qualify to say that, by virtue of living (barely) on the southern side of the Mason-Dixon Line. Maryland is kind of north and kind of south. I know people who say, "Y'all", but if I drive north a little way I can find Pennsylvanians saying, "Y'ins". I think that is short for "You-ins", which means... something. The fact that I understand and use "Y'all" and not "Y'ins" must make me more southern than northern. But I probably think more like a northener. I guess I'll just stick with being a Mid-Atlantic Chaser. I know what that means!
Anushka's picture

As a home-grown Georgia peach, I absolutely love this post; although, I can't say that I find our accents "charming", mostly because I live here and everyone sounds the same to me. To me, it's non-Southerns that sound different to me and "charming" to me. I am SO glad you understand y'all and all y'all. I had a friend from England who teased me about y'all, asking if I ever said w'all (for we all). I also have some from friends AL, and, like you, I'm also amazed at their ability to say Roll Tide in response to absolutely everything! And if you are looking for good ghost tours, go to Savannah. Savannah, Georgia is supposedly rife with ghostly activity. And yes...Sweet tea seems, to me anyway, to exist only in the South, because after a certain point traveling north and after a certain point going south into Florida, when you ask for sweet tea, people look at you like you've grown a second head and will actually ask "What's sweet tea?". It's rather funny having to explain the concept of putting sugar into tea to a non-Southerner.
Rich Bentel's picture

Quick add on: My first exposure to the south was my third grade teacher. She had family in the south and she told us that when her family wanted to make sure everyone was enjoying themselves they would ask "Y'all funnin'?"
Rich Bentel's picture

There should be weekly, nay daily, blog-offs between Ryan and Don. Ryan, you hit me to my core. As a Southerner in a Northerner's body (I've never lived further south than 20 miles south of Chicago) all twenty points vicariously hit home. Everything you wrote about is what I imagine the south to be, including the chance to meet my all time favorite music group at a truck stop at 2:30 in the morning - how cool would that be? Honestly, that may be the only thing missing from SNC. You have the Midwestern morals and work ethic, you have the brother. The only thing missing is a little Southern Twang. Please don't be a stranger to the blog. And tell Don to get his act in gear. The rookie is supposed to be carrying the heavy load.
Rhapsodie40's picture

First of all Ryan, let me just tell you that y'all did an AMAZING job last night. Yep, I was at that Chattanooga concert. :o) That was the first time I'd seen y'all in concert, but I can tell you now it won't be the last! Secondly, I have been born and raised in the South (Tennessee). I even went to college in Kentucky. So I am a true Southerner, and proud of it, by the way. I love reading people's take on Southerners, so this blog post just tickled me to death. My mama thought I was a little off my rocker when I was sitting at the breakfast table laughing about it! But, having said that, I totally get everything you said! Those are a lot of the reasons I've continued to stay in the South. Wouldn't wanna live anywhere else, actually. Just wanted to say thanks to all y'all (or you'uns, don't forget that one! LOL) for sharing your talent with us last night. Keep up the fantastic work & I'll be watching for the next full length CD on iTunes! LOVE Y'ALL!!!! PS~Please keep the Gotye! That was kick butt!
Maria Fulton's picture

This was awesome. And every single one of your reasons for loving the south are the same as mine. (born and raised Virginian but converted New Yorker.) And, jsyk, I was on a train to Manhattan when I read this and I think everyone thought I was nuts laughing out loud.... So I blame you... :D Tell Don it's his turn now! :)
Rene A's picture

YEA!!!!!!!! FINALLY!!!! yeah, this is the lady from CT again...was beyond withdrawl for a blog from ya, but I didn't want to nag. Interesting as always, and revealing too! Love the replies so far... you obviously struck a (harmonious) chord with SNC's fans! To this day I catch myself humming "baby monkey" at odd times... I'm really looking forward to your new material this year- Walt's a talented guy! And the way you all bring the material to life is just fabulous. Here's to you! And don't be such a stranger! Cheers! Rene
Laurie_2's picture

Love this, Ryan ! I'm a Hoosier born and bred--and proud of our Hoosier hospitality, but I have always found people in the South to be so sweet and welcoming. DON'T understand the appeal of sweet tea (artificially-sweetened or real "shugah"). Never have, never will. How about just a little lemon and leave perfection alone? LOL When my nieces moved to Alabama, they "found" an accent. Of course, there's the mandatory y'all and all y'all, counting became "wohn, teooo, tharee, etc., my sister became their "Moahma" -- but my absolute favorite is that "tacos" became "TOCK-hoes" -- absolutely LOVE IT!

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